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Chelsie's Garden SOIL-utions

In the News

Chelsie on Global News Morning Show

Sun, Mar 5: Gardening expert Chelsie Anderson joins Global Calgary to talk about what people can look forward to growing at home and in the garden as the temperature heats up.

Six lessons the flood taught gardeners

“It was really important for mom to get the garden back to its pre-flood beauty. The inside of the house has been so difficult to rebuild (and) the garden was more tangible. It brings mom a lot of happiness — people stop and talk to mom all the time.”

— Claire Becq, daughter of flood victims Jean Becq and Gloria McLaughlin

Last year’s flood only affected a few gardeners, so it has nothing to do with most of us, right? Wrong.

The flood presents valuable lessons for every gardener. I spoke with gardener Gloria McLaughlin and her family as well as my daughter, Chelsie Anderson, who gardens for families in the flood zone. The flood may have physically affected only a few yards in Alberta, but its effects are relevant to everyone who wants to make our world a prettier place.

Fortney: It's raining cats and dogs — and lily-eating beetles

The driving rains have come with alarming afternoon regularity, the hail has sometimes been as big as ping pong balls and the flash flooding has forced more than a few Calgarians to wait on hold with their insurance companies.

Welcome to the official Soggy Summer of 2016, one that has brought to life such new traditions as the daily “running of the potted plants,” as residents try to spare their container gardens from one more pummelling.

As far as Chelsie Anderson is concerned, though, things aren’t so bad. “A lot of plants are ticking along nicely,” says the proprietor of Chelsie’s Garden SOILutions, a private gardening business she’s been running for several summers. “The hydrangeas are fantastic this year, a lot of flowers seem to be big and beautiful.”

Gardeners, it's time to get growing in Calgary (within reason)

Don’t let my disasters in gardening hold you back this spring. In the past, I have risked it all and lost big time but this year is different.

It has been unseasonably warm. My keen daughter, Chelsie Anderson, has been seeding spinach, chard and lettuce and setting up her straw bale gardens since March. In the past, I have been devastated by frost on tomatoes in my greenhouse in May, suckered by 15 centimetres of snow on outdoor zucchini in June, and crushed by bean-killing frost in August. But whether you are an optimistic new gardener or a frequently devastated older one, I am officially announcing —  it’s time to get growing in Calgary.

Donna Balzer: To buy or not to buy – that is the question for gardeners

Every summer brings a new crop of garden gadgets and products to get new gardeners scratching their heads. Do you really need all this new stuff to be a better gardener?

 “To buy or not to buy” — that is the question.

Start growing in your kitchen:

Christine Nesbitt is the sole employee of Calgary-based Crop, a local shop specializing in small-space food growing. At the shop, Nesbitt bubbles over with enthusiasm for everything from seed sprouting to making your own kimchi. When pushed to suggest a single great thing, she enthuses about seed sprouting kits ($4.99), but big spenders can drop $2,699 for the Urban Cultivator, a fully automated seed sprouting system.

Chelsie on CTV morning Show

We're sprouting happiness with mid winter gardener Chelsie Anderson. Chelsie is going to show us

how to grow our own micro greens and sprouts.

Chelsie on CTV Morning News